February 28, 2013

Make a 72-Hour Kit in 12 Steps: Step 5 - Activities

We don't always think about what we are going to do at an emergency shelter after we evacuate, but it probably isn't easy to sit around waiting and waiting when we are limited on communication with family, tired and stressed. I have never evacuated, so I can only imagine what it would be like for me. I would definitely want a few activities in my 72-hour kit to keep me preoccupied. Young children especially need something to do. These activities don't have to be expensive, and should be lightweight.

Collect a few items and put them in a plastic zipper bag to protect them from water damage. Here are a few suggestions:

Step 5: Activities
  • Word Games - These could be printed online or you could purchase a small book from the dollar store. Crossword puzzles, word search activities, Sudoku, coloring pages, etc. If you are printing, print on the front and back of the paper. You can copy and reduce so you can fit 4 on one side and 4 on the other side.
  • Motivational Talks - Copy one of your favorite inspiring talks from the Ensign or other church magazine. Reduce it and add it to your bag.
  • Playing Cards - Find an inexpensive set at the dollar store or in dollar bins at Target or Michaels. Perhaps Uno or Rook. Something your family regularly plays.
  • Notepad and Pen - Probably the things a writer like me would want the most. A lightweight notepad to record my thoughts and feelings. Or it could be used to play games or even write an emergency note.
  • Small Toys - Choose a toy that you know your child will be excited to find in their kit. My youngest chose a small stuffed animal for her kit. Well . . . actually this morning I opened her 72-hour kit to take a picture to show you, and found it had multiplied to this:
  • I'm not sure when my sweet girl added all of the toys in the first picture to her 72-hour kit, but Mommy reduced the number items to a few and is hoping she will forgive me later.

February 24, 2013

Utah Case Lot Sales Coming February 2013

For those of you living in Utah, the Spring case lot sales are coming! Here are the dates:

Winegars, Lee's - Monday, February 25th
Peterson's - Tuesday, February 26th
Bowman's & Kents - Wednesday, February 27th

For a sneak preview, go here.

Food Storage Goals: February Week 9 - Powdered Eggs


This week our food storage focus is dried egg powder.

STEP 1: 3-Month Supply (per adult) - Powdered whole eggs 8 oz. (optional)
Why?: Powdered eggs can be helpful if we had an egg shortage, power outage or while camping. They are made from real eggs, are pasteurized and are simple to prepare by just adding water. Check your label to know how much powder and water you need to make 1 egg.
Tip: They are not cheap, so try to buy when they are on sale. Most 33 - 40 oz. cans cost $22.00 and make 70 to 80 eggs, which is about .25 per egg. If you live in Utah, there is a case lot sale going on this week with Augason Farms whole eggs at $16.99. But I have found them priced closer to $13.50 at Macey's during the case lot sale in April.
Tip: Find other foods you can substitute for eggs here.
Shelf Life: 3 - 10 years, varies by manufacturer.

STEP 2: Drinking Water - 14 gallons (FEMA) or about 4x24 ct. cases of bottled water
(Skip this step if you've already got it.)
Tip: Stock up this month! It's everywhere today, but it may not be tomorrow. Buy more to replenish what you use. Small bottles are for short-term storage because you periodically use them. More durable containers are for long-term storage and need to be refilled every 6 months.
Shelf Life: small bottles see Still Tasty.com

STEP 3: Financial Reserve (per person) - $2.00 +/- per week
(Skip this if you've already accumulated your goal.)
Tip: Start your fund this month! Decide on an amount you want for emergencies and put aside weekly amounts until you build up your reserve. Keep some in the bank and some cash at home.

STEP 4: Longer-Term Supply (per adult) - Nothing this week.

Home Storage: Toiletries Group 2 (per adult) - Mouthwash 3 ea. for 3-month supply
Tip: Use your best judgement to figure out how much to stock for your family. A 3-month or 12 -month supply may be affordable for some families, but a 1 month supply may work for others. Once you know how much you want to stock, try to restock it after you use one item.

Preparedness Goal - CERT Training
How: If you would like to become part of the Community Emergency Response Teams in your neighborhood or workplace, sign up for CERT training. It usually takes 2 Saturdays to learn basic disaster response skills.

Equipment Goal - Ham radio or walkie talkies (optional)
Why: During a disaster, users of ham radios are able to help with communication. You may already be trained through your church or work. Or, you may have sport walkie talkies that can also help with communication. Keep your equipment in workable order and teach your family how to use it.

Weekly Inventory - Baking Basics
How: Go through your supply of these items. They include all of your baking ingredients, but don't include fats, oils and spices. Count, organize, and use those close to their expiration date. Toss dented or torn container items. Mark what you have on your inventory list.

Good luck on your weekly goals. You CAN do it! Here is the printout of the February 2013 Food Storage list.

Instructions:
Each week, I post various food storage and emergency items to gather. By stocking up year round, you build up your supplies economically, use some, leave some on the shelf, and buy some more. Cycling keeps your items fresh and integrated into your everyday diet. I've incorporated the LDS 4-Step Approach to Home Storage, but with my suggested items to gather.

Work on STEP 1, 2 and 3, before moving to STEP 4: Long-Term Food Supply. It may take you awhile to gather your 3-Month Supply, water and a financial reserve. As long as you are moving forward, that's what matters most. Only gather what you can afford, will eat, and choose goals you have time for. Substitute other foods that work for your family.

Your food storage should consist of shelf-stable foods. What we store in our 3-month supply (STEP 1) is everyday foods or short-term storage foods which have an approximate range of 3 month - 10 year shelf-life. What we store in our long-term supply are foods that have a 20 to 30 year shelf life. Don't consider what's in your refrigerator or freezer as this type of storage, because it could be gone quickly with a 24-hour power outage. However, we all buy perishable foods and can continue to purchase them and inventory them. Hope that all made sense.

Remember, design your food storage for your family, your way. Nothing cookie-cutter about this.

February 23, 2013

Video: "Mountains to Climb"

No matter how difficult our trials are in this life, we have not been left alone. Each of us will face difficult challenges that will test us and stretch us. Will we face them or run from them? Will we despair or turn to Jesus Christ. May we each have the faith to know that we can lean on Him when life seems almost too difficult to bear.

February 18, 2013

Food Storage Goals: February Week 8 - Pancakes & Syrup

This week our food storage focus is pancake mix & pancake syrup.

My son comes home from his mission in 17 days :-) and my daughter just started her mission papers. You may not hear much from me over the next few weeks, but I will try to get some posts out as I can.

Remember, your food storage should consist of shelf-stable foods. What we store in our 3-month supply (STEP 1) is everyday foods or short-term storage foods which have an approximate range of 3 month - 10 year shelf-life. What we store in our long-term supply are foods that have a 20 to 30 year shelf life. Don't consider what's in your refrigerator or freezer as this type of storage, because it could be gone quickly with a 24-hour power outage. However, we all buy perishable foods and can continue to purchase them and inventory them. Hope that all made sense.

STEP 1: 3-Month Supply (per adult) - Pancake mix: 2 lbs. AND Pancake syrup: 32 oz.
Why?: Pancake mix and syrup are an easy prep meal. Definitely convenience foods for those who don't make them from scratch. If you do make pancakes from scratch, store an equivalent amount of ingredients. You could also store real maple syrup or agave nectar. The choice is always yours.
Tip: Costco sells 10 lb. Krusteaz pancake mix for $6.40 and Sam's Club sells 10 lb. Daily Chef pancake mix for $6.00. I picked up 2 bags of pancake mix and 2 containers of syrup last week.
Shelf Life: both have a 1 year

STEP 2: Drinking Water - 14 gallons (FEMA) or about 4x24 ct. cases of bottled water
(Skip this step if you've already got it.)
Tip: Stock up this month! It's everywhere today, but it may not be tomorrow. Buy more to replenish what you use. Small bottles are for short-term storage because you periodically use them. More durable containers are for long-term storage and need to be refilled every 6 months.
Shelf Life: small bottles see Still Tasty.com

STEP 3: Financial Reserve (per person) - $2.00 +/- per week
(Skip this if you've already accumulated your goal.)
Tip: Start your fund this month! Decide on an amount you want for emergencies and put aside weekly amounts until you build up your reserve. Keep some in the bank and some cash at home.

STEP 4: Longer-Term Supply (per adult) - None this week.

Home Storage: Toiletries Group 2 (per adult) - Dental floss 3 ea.
Tip: Use your best judgement to figure out how much to stock up on for your family.

Preparedness Goal - Collect 7 breakfast recipes
How: Gather a few family favorite recipes, type them up and store in a binder or recipe card file. Focus on those recipes that use as much shelf-stable ingredients as possible such as pancakes, waffles, oatmeal, granola, muffins, sweet rolls, and crepes. Look for ideas at My Food Storage Cookbook, The Prudent Homemaker or just about any of your favorite sites.

Equipment Goal - NOAA AM/FM weather radio or app
Tip: NOAA radios continually broadcast "weather service warnings, watches, forecasts and other hazard information 24 hours a day, 7 days a week." NOAA stands for National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. I have one of the buttons on my car radio always set for the station in my area. For a list of stations, go here. Do not rely on the internet to receive watches and warnings unless you have a backup power source. A radio costs about $30. Check out some of the new apps as well.

Weekly Inventory - Beans, Meat, Soups
How: Go through your supply of these items. Count, organize, and use those close to their expiration date. Toss dented or torn container items. Mark what you have on your inventory list.

Good luck on your weekly goals. You CAN do it! Here is the printout of the February 2013 Food Storage list.

Instructions:
Each week, I post various food storage and emergency items to gather. By stocking up year round, you build up your supplies economically, use some, leave some on the shelf, and buy some more. Cycling keeps your items fresh and integrated into your everyday diet. I've incorporated the LDS 4-Step Approach to Home Storage, but with my suggested items to gather.

Work on STEP 1, 2 and 3, before moving to STEP 4: Long-Term Food Supply. It may take you awhile to gather your 3-Month Supply, water and a financial reserve. As long as you are moving forward, that's what matters most. Only gather what you can afford, will eat, and choose goals you have time for. Substitute other foods that work for your family.

Remember, design your food storage for your family, your way. Nothing cookie-cutter about this.

February 13, 2013

My Tour of Salt Lake City LDS Welfare Square

Grain silos at Welfare Square
One of my fondest dreams has been to take a tour of Welfare Square; headquarters of the welfare program of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Well, I got my wish today. My teen daughter thinks I'm a bit weird to have a dream like that. :-) But, you know me.

You would think I would have been there already, since I only live 25 minutes away from this amazing place. But this busy mom needed to make it a priority to travel down I-15 to spend an afternoon there.

Quilt in one of the hallways. The beehive is the symbol of industry.
The square is laid out on 13.5 acres about a mile west of Salt Lake City. "The square also includes a bakery, a dairy plant, a Deseret Industries thrift store, a bishops’ storehouse and store serving families that receive Church assistance, an employment center, and tall silos for storing wheat." LDS.org

I arrived at 1 p.m. and entered the visitors center on the north-end of the Bishop’s Storehouse where two amazing LDS sister missionaries greeted me; Sister Samoa and Sister California. At this time of day, I had a private tour all to myself.

They shared a beautiful film about the purpose of the welfare program. The film explained how the Church helps those in need with food, clothing, and help finding employment. Fast offering funds from church members helps provide for the food in the storehouse, or it is produced on church-owned agricultural property. The service rendered is patterned after the teachings of Jesus Christ who spent his life reaching out to those in need.

After the film, we walked through the Bishop’s Storehouse where church members who have talked with their bishop can come for food. There is also a transient service center that gives food to homeless people from all faiths. We entered a huge warehouse where pallets of food were stocked on shelves similar to those in Costco. They also showed me an emergency food kit used to feed people after a disaster. Each kit is modified for the diet of those in the country or area of the disaster.

Sample disaster emergency kit.
Then we walked to the bakery where 4,000 loaves of wheat and white bread are made daily to help feed those in need. It smelled yummy! Most of those working were volunteers.

The bakery
We walked through a cannery where honey, applesauce and jam are canned. Then passed the home storage center where you may can and purchase your own grains and other foods. I told the senior service missionaries that I would be back at the end of my tour to see them. Most of these volunteers live locally and work 8 hour shifts.

Next I saw the dairy area where cheddar cheese is cut into 1 lb. blocks.

Cheddar cheese being cut. Volunteers are in the blue caps.
At the milk bottling plant, I recognized the yummy chocolate milk which is sold at the BYU creamery. The Church owns various dairies to make the dairy products.


I was able to sample some chocolate milk, cheese, wheat bread and butter. Fresh is definitely wonderful!

We past the Deseret Industries thrift store where those on church assistance are given clothing and furnishings. The sisters said only 15% of donations are sold in the thrift stores, and 85% of donations are sent to places in need and around the world. Amazing! And only the items in the best condition are sent. I keep a box in my garage all the time for items we donate to the D.I.

We walked into the LDS Employment Services where members and non-members come for help to find a job. Many people of those looking for jobs were working on computers. They can also take classes to learn how to create a resume and how to interview for a job.

After my tour, I returned to the home storage center to can some oats; one of our food storage breakfast goals this month. I only needed 12 cans, but we canned extra for someone else in need. It was quick and I loved the help I received. I was done in 20 minutes! Afternoons are a great time to go.

Oats in my cans
I also bought some canned corn, chili, peach jam and canned peaches. If you are not a member of my church and want to can food at any of the home storage centers, contact a Mormon in your neighborhood or the service missionaries there.

A few of the great senior service missionaries who helped me today.
I am so grateful for such an amazing LDS welfare program that was organized to help those in need and help us all to become self-reliant. For me, the greatest blessing of this program is the opportunity to help others. It is "when ye are in the service of your fellow beings ye are only in the service of your God." May we each find opportunities to serve. What a blessing to be part of this great church!

If you are ever in the Salt Lake City area, call (801) 240-4872 to schedule a weekday tour of Welfare Square. They are open all year long (except holidays). Tours start at the top of each hour and are free. The address is 780 West 800 South Salt Lake City, UT 84104.

Helpful Articles:
Welfare and Self-Reliance from Mormon Newsroom
Welfare Square Service by Bottle and Loaf, Ensign Magazine, October 2001
Missionary Moments: Real Welfare work from LDS Church News

February 12, 2013

Make a 72-Hour Kit in 12 Steps: Step 4 - Personal Hygiene Items

The next step for your 72-Hour kits is personal hygiene items including toiletries, some sanitation items, bug spray and sunscreen. These items would be difficult to be without during a disaster. It's important to keep these items small and lightweight, so they don't make your bags too heavy.

I put our personal items in several plastic Ziploc bags so we can find them quickly, and to prevent items from water damage. The extra contact lenses are easy to forget to pack, so I moved them to the top of the list. They sure would be nice to have if you get dirt or soot in your eyes. You may want to ask your eye doctor if he is willing to give you a sample pair.

Another good idea is to put a label on the bags with a list of the contents. I haven't done that, but things are packed so tightly in our bags and not used regularly, so it is easier to forget what is in them.

An inexpensive idea for toiletries, is to use the ones you get from a hotel. You can also ask your dentist for some sample sizes. And many of the items listed below can be gathered from your own supplies. You could get samples if you order them in the mail, but it will take longer. I went ahead and listed prices from a few stores. Adapt the list for the age and needs of each family member. More ideas can be found on my Pinterest board with 72-Hour Kit ideas.

PERSONAL HYGIENE ITEMS FOR 72-HOUR KITS
  • extra glasses or contacts
  • contact lens solution (eye doctor sample)
  • travel toothpaste/brush ($1.00 Dollar Tree)
  • shampoo, lotion, body wash (hotel size)
  • deodorant ($1.00 Dollar Tree)
  • lip balm ($1.00 2 pk Dollar Tree)
  • razor ($1.00 10pk Dollar Tree)
  • washcloth ($1.00 4pk baby wash cloths Dollar Tree)
  • comb/brush/mirror (try folding brush/mirror combo)
  • pocket hand sanitizer ($1.00 for 3pk Dollar Tree)
  • pocket tissues ($1.00 for 8pk Dollar Tree)
  • toilet paper (put in a baggie)
  • cleansing wipes (put baby wipes in a baggie; or $1.00 30pk Dollar Tree)
  • feminine items (gather from your own supplies)
  • bug repellent spray ($3.75 REI)
  • sunscreen packets (Amazon)
INFANTS
  • diapers
  • baby wipes
  • small plastic bags for dirty diapers

    February 10, 2013

    Food Storage Goals: February Week 7 - Oats

    This week our food storage focus is oats.

    STEP 1: 3-Month Supply (per adult) - Oats: 5 lbs. or 2x42 oz. canisters or 2 #10 LDS cans
    Why?: I get excited about oats because they are inexpensive and versatile, and great for the digestive system. They come in steel-cut, rolled and instant. You can make oatmeal, granola, cookies, brownies, apple crisp and so much more! Your 3-Month Supply should include shelf-stable foods your normally eats. Adapt how much based on the eating habits of your family. The amount shown assumes you currently eat additional items for breakfast. This is an item you will consistently replenish.
    Tip: Store a few varieties based on your cooking needs. If you are having a difficult time opening #10 cans with a manual can opener, open them upside down.
    Shelf Life: 1 year

    STEP 2: Drinking Water - 14 gallons (FEMA) or about 4x24 ct. cases of bottled water
    (Skip this step if you've already got it.)
    Tip: Stock up this month! It's everywhere today, but it may not be tomorrow. Buy more to replenish what you use. Small bottles are for short-term storage because you periodically use them. More durable containers are for long-term storage and need to be refilled every 6 months.
    Shelf Life: small bottles see Still Tasty.com

    STEP 3: Financial Reserve (per person) - $2.00 +/- per week
    (Skip this if you've already accumulated your goal.)
    Tip: Start your fund this month! Decide on an amount you want for emergencies and put aside weekly amounts until you build up your reserve. Keep some in the bank and some cash at home.

    STEP 4: Longer-Term Supply (per adult) - Oats: 20 lbs. or 8 #10 LDS cans or 6x3.3 lb. Mylar bags
    Tips: Bucket amounts are not listed, because I prefer not to open a bucket knowing I have to use all of the item. However, if you use a lot of oats, buckets are a great way to store this item. Buying in bulk is fairly inexpensive. The LDS Home Storage Centers have 50 lb. bags of regular or quick oats for less than $16.00. Canning there yourself: 2.7 lb. #10 cans $2.50 ea., 3.3 lb. Mylar pouches $2.55 ea. Read my experience touring and canning at Welfare Square.
    Shelf Life: 30 years with proper packaging and stored in a dry place at or below 75 degrees F (24 degrees C).

    Toiletries Group 2 (per adult) - Toothpaste 1 ea.
    Tip: Use your best judgement to figure out how much to stock up on for your family. A 3-month or 12 -month supply may be affordable for some families, but a 1 month supply may work for others. Once you know how much you want to stock, try to restock it after you use one.

    Preparedness Goal - Copy important documents
    How: What should you copy for your grab and go kits? What should you put in a safety deposit box? What should you shred and what should you keep? This is the most complete resource I have ever seen and was updated in January 2013. Check out Managing Household Records at USA.gov.

    Equipment Goal - Crank or solar cell phone charger
    Why: How quickly does your cell phone battery die? You could be without power for  a week. How will you charge your cell phone so you can communicate with others or check the news? Consider investing in a device that will help you charge your cell phone. A few options are a hand crank charger for about $17.00 or a solar charger for about $120.00.

    Weekly Inventory - Snacks
    How: Go through your supply of snacks such as food bars, chips, crackers, etc. Count, organize, and use those items close to their expiration date. Toss dented or torn container. Mark amounts on your inventory list.

    Good luck on your weekly goals. You CAN do it! Here is the printout of the February 2013 Food Storage list.

    Instructions:
    Each week, I post various food storage and emergency items to gather. By stocking up year round, you build up your supplies economically, use some, leave some on the shelf, and buy some more. Cycling keeps your items fresh and integrated into your everyday diet. I've incorporated the LDS 4-Step Approach to Home Storage, but with my suggested items to gather.

    Work on STEP 1, 2 and 3, before moving to STEP 4: Long-Term Food Supply. It may take you awhile to gather your 3-Month Supply, water and a financial reserve. As long as you are moving forward, that's what matters most. Only gather what you can afford, will eat, and choose goals you have time for. Substitute other foods that work for your family.

    February 9, 2013

    Video: "Expressions of Love"

    This video taught me that love can be expressed in many different ways. Even as simple as words written on hole punch dots. As we enter this Valentine's week, may you each find ways to show those you love that you really care. If you are looking for simple Valentine's to make with your children for their schoolmates, check out my Valentine's Day Pinterest page.

    February 5, 2013

    Make a 72-Hour Kit in 12 Steps: Step 3 - Clothing

    Some of the challenges with choosing clothes for our 72-hour kits are changes in our clothing sizes and seasons. So your best option is to pack clothes that will work in most weather conditions, and items that are bigger than what each family member currently wears.

    Whatever you choose, a change of clothes in your 72-hour kit will be useful if you ever need it. Imagine evacuating in a skirt and heels; common clothing attire for many LDS women headed to church. Or a man wearing a suit and tie? A change of clothes would very helpful if the clothes you are wearing get dirty, torn or wet.

    You probably won't be able to fit all of your clothing inside your backpack, so you will probably need an additional bag. Clothes pack more easily if you roll them up together and wrap with a rubber-band. Shoes just need to be near the pack. To economically build your clothing packs, go through your home and gather what you already have before you head to the store.

    It is recommended that you keep your 72-hour kits near an exit of your home. We keep our shoes by the front door and our packs in the front closet. I don't care how un-decorative my entryway looks with shoes in a basket and boots on a drying mat. Knowing our shoes are there is a good feeling. Our snow coats hang in the front closet, and I just stacked our snow pants on a shelf in there as well.

    Update your 72-hour kits every 6 months to make sure your clothing still fits. Some LDS families check their 72-hour kits around General Conference time in April and October.

    A few years ago I picked up some matching yellow T-shirts at Michael's craft store so each family member would stand out in a crowd if we ever got separated. Some families have matching tie-dyed shirts which could be a fun family home evening idea. For bottoms I like sport pants and snow pants.

    February is a great time to find needed items because stores are practically giving away cold weather items. You can even pick up used pants at a thrift store. I know jeans seem warmer, but they don't dry easily when they get wet. Obviously, choose what you think will be best for your family.

    Most of you moms with infants already keep well-stocked diaper bags which make perfect 72-hour kits for children because you are consistently changing the clothing and food as your child grows.

    Hopefully, you will get started if you haven't begun already. Whatever 72-hour kit clothing you choose will be one step forward to having some peace of mind.

    Suggested Clothing Ideas
    • Underwear (2)
    • Socks (2)
    • Long-sleeved t-shirt
    • Short-sleeved t-shirt
    • Long pants (sport pants or snow pants)
    • Cap or beanie hat
    • Mittens or gloves
    • Closed-toe shoes
    • Coat (consider the current night temperature)
    • Rain-poncho or large plastic trash bag

    72-Hour Kit in 12 Steps

    February 4, 2013

    Food Storage Goals: February Week 6 - Breakfast Cereal


    This week our food storage focus is breakfast cereal.

    STEP 1: 3-Month Supply (per adult) - 3 boxes. breakfast cereal
    Why?: A useful everyday item as well as helpful during power outages as some can be eaten without milk. Consider the needs your family. There are various types of cereals you could store including boxed or bagged breakfast cereal, instant oatmeal, granola, cream of wheat, etc. Your 3-Month Supply should include shelf-stable foods your normally eats. Adapt how much based on the eating habits of your family. The amount shown assumes you currently eat additional items for breakfast. This is an item you need to constantly replenish.
    Tip: I stack our cereal boxes horizontal with one box on top of the other so the expiration date can be seen.
    Shelf Life: look at the shelf life on the item(s) you choose to store. Many have a 1 year shelf life.

    STEP 2: Drinking Water - 14 gallons (FEMA) or about 4x24 ct. cases of bottled water
    (Skip this step if you've already got it.)
    Tip: Stock up this month! It's everywhere today, but it may not be tomorrow. Buy more to replenish what you use. Small bottles are for short-term storage because you periodically use them. More durable containers are for long-term storage and need to be refilled every 6 months.
    Shelf Life: see Still Tasty.com

    STEP 3: Financial Reserve (per person) - $2.00 +/- per week
    (Skip this if you've already accumulated your goal.)
    Tip: Start your fund this month! Use only for emergencies. Keep some in the bank and some cash at home.

    STEP 4: Longer-Term Supply (per adult) - no item this week

    Toiletries Group 2 (per adult) - Toothbrush 1 ea.
    Tip: Use your best judgement to figure out how much to stock up on for your family. A 3-month or 12 -month supply may be affordable for some families, but a 1 month supply may work for others. Once you know how much you want to stock, try to restock it after you use one.

    Preparedness Goal - Emergency contact list
    How: Create a list of the numbers of those you would contact in an emergency. Make sure your teens have these numbers stored in their cell phone. Have an out of state contact that you would all call if lines in state don't work.

    Equipment Goal - Cell phone with text ability
    Why: After some disasters, cell phone calling becomes impossible. However, texting may still work. Consider having this function on your cell phone if you don't already.

    Weekly Inventory - Fruits and Vegetables
    How: Go through your supply of these items and count, organize, use those close to their expiration date, or toss dented or torn container items. Mark on your inventory list. I only count a small portion of my items each week.

    Good luck on your weekly goals. You CAN do it! Here is the printout of the February 2013 Food Storage list.

    Instructions:
    Each week, I post various food storage and emergency items to gather. By stocking up year round, you build up your supplies economically, use some, leave some on the shelf, and buy some more. Cycling keeps your items fresh and integrated into your everyday diet. I've incorporated the LDS 4-Step Approach to Home Storage, but with my suggested items to gather.

    Work on STEP 1, 2 and 3, before moving to STEP 4: Long-Term Food Supply. It may take you awhile to gather your 3-Month Supply, water and a financial reserve. As long as you are moving forward, that's what matters most. Only gather what you can afford, will eat, and choose goals you have time for. Substitute other foods that work for your family.

    February 3, 2013

    How To Add Videos to Your Blogger Sidebar

    Many LDS bloggers would love to know how to add videos such as Mormon Messages to the sidebar of their Blogger blogs. There may be an easier way, but here is how I do it.

    How to Add a Video to Your Blogger Sidebar
    1. Sign in to YouTube or create an account if you don't have one
    2. Find the video you want to share
    3. Pause the video or it will keep playing :-) 
    4. Click on "Share" which is next to "About" 
    5. The window "Share this video" will open up 
    6. Click on "Embed" 
    7. Check your little option boxes. I use "Share with playlist starting from current video," and "Show suggested videos when the video finishes" and "Enable privacy-enhanced mode." You may choose different options. Read the definitions to know what you want to do.
    8. Choose the "Video size" based on the size of your sidebar. I usually customize the size by changing the width and height in the code box. (If you don't know the size of your side bar, go to Blogger Design, click on Template, in the middle click on the orange Customize, click on Adjust widths and you will see the size of your side bar(s).)
    9. Copy the code
    10. Go to your Blogger page. In the upper right click on Blogger Design; click on Layout page
    11. Go to "Add a Gadget" on your layout
    12. Open an HTML/JavaScript gadget
    13. Paste the code into the gadget. Decide if you want a title or not, and save.
    14. Preview the page to see if the video is the correct size. If not change your size in the HTML/JavaScript gadget. Or go back to YouTube and repeat the above steps.
    15. Slide the gadget to the position you want on your sidebar.
    16. Click the orange "Save arrangement" button.
    17. View your blog and see click on the video to see if it works. You did it!
    Let me know if this explanation was simple enough. I love seeing LDS videos on blogs. Share the message and spread the Gospel. Good luck adding a video to your blog!

    LDS YouTube Videos You May Want to Share
    Make sure you watch official videos from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
    Book of Mormon: An Introduction
    Mormon Missionaries: An Introduction
    The Book of Mormon: A Book With A Promise
    Mormon Temples: The Blessings of the Temple
    Families Can Be Together Forever

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