April 30, 2011

Family Emergency Plan and Contact Cards

It has been disheartening to watch the news about tornados in the midwest. Listening to the devastation is overwhelming, however, as I've listened to the news stories I am trying to learn what helps others prepare for disasters. We do not live in torado alley, but there is always something to learn. Contacting family members appears to be a major challenge in any disaster. Cell phone usage is limited, though texting sometimes will work. Wireless telephones to not work without power, but landlines (phones that do not require electricity but plug into a telephone line) do work, however many people no longer have landlines. You can read more about communications during a disaster here.

Some things to consider:
Make a hard copy of emergency contact numbers for each family member.
Update this list at least every 6 months
Include 2 to 3 meeting places outside the home
Include 2 to 3 contact numbers with the first one being out of state
List the local news channel and radio station that will have emergency information

Places to Keep These Numbers
In kids school bags (they could be on their way home and not at school when an emergency happens)
In wallets or purses
In cars
In 72-hour kits

You can find several family emergency plans and emergency cards at Ready.gov

Four-Step Approach to Home Storage



My newly updated preparedness video!

This is an overview of the Four-Step Home Storage approach recommended by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. You will see a brief overview of the new LDS Church home storage guidelines and learn the value of gathering a 3-Month food storage supply, water, and emergency funds, FIRST before you focus on long-term foods. Learn to prepare yourself line upon line for times of adversity such as job loss, financial difficulties, disasters, and medical emergencies.

This was used at a Relief Society meeting in May 2009, but was updated in April 2011 for an emergency preparedness fair.

Special thanks to Jon Schmidt for permission to use his music (jonschmidt.com).

PreparedLDSFamily.blogspot.com

April 28, 2011

LDS Church Assessing Needs After Violent Weather Hits Southern United States

Church Assessing Needs After Violent Weather Hits Southern United States

28 April 2011 — Salt Lake City
Members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the southern United States are among those affected by a series of deadly tornadoes that hit six states. At last report, the storms have killed at least 280 people and injured hundreds more. The loss of life is the worst from tornadoes in the United States in nearly 40 years.

All missionaries in the area are safe and accounted for. The homes of several Latter-day Saints in Alabama and Mississippi have been damaged or destroyed, but there are no reports of significant damage to Church buildings.

Church members are helping with cleanup efforts; local leaders will continue to monitor the situation to determine how to best support relief efforts and assist those in need.

April 25, 2011

STEP 4: Longer-Term Supply

(If you've completed the first three steps of the LDS Four-Step Home Storage approach, you may now work on this fourth step. Here are the other steps:

STEP 1: 3-Month Supply
STEP: 2 Drinking Water
STEP 3: Financial Reserve

STEP 4: Longer-Term Supply
"For longer-term needs, and where permitted, gradually build a supply of food that will last a long time and that you can use to stay alive, such as wheat, white rice, and beans. These items can last 30 years or more when properly packaged and stored in a cool, dry place. A portion of these items may be rotated in your three-month supply."

"Longer-term supply items are basic food items like grains and beans that have very low moisture content (about 10% or less), can be stored for long periods of time (20–30 years), and would sustain life if nothing else were available to eat. A portion of longer-term supply items may be rotated into the three-month supply." (Frequently Ask Questions, ProvidentLiving.org)

Me: Most people try to gather a year's supply of long-term foods, however how many months of food you can store in your home depends on your finances and storage space.If you can store a year's supply, then work towards that goal. Do the best you can for your circumstances. If you live in a studio apartment, you probably don't have enough space for a year's supply of food.

ProvidentLiving.org suggestions:

A One-Month Recommended Supply
25 lbs. Wheat, white rice, corn, and other grains 30+ years
5 lbs. Dry beans 30+ years

"You may also want to add other items to your longer-term storage such as sugar, nonfat dry milk, salt, baking soda, and cooking oil. To meet nutritional needs, also store foods containing Vitamin C and other essential nutrients."

"If stored at room temperature or cooler (75°F/24°C or lower) these items can remain nutritious and edible for many years -

  • Wheat 30+ YRS
  • White Rice 30+ YRS(not brown rice)
  • Corn 30+ YRS
  • Sugar 30+ YRS
  • Pinto Beans 30 YRS
  • Rolled Oats 30 YRS
  • Pasta 30 YRS
  • Potato Flakes 30 YRS (not Potato Pearls)
  • Apple slices 30 YRS
  • Non-fat powdered milk 20 YRS
  • Dehydrated Carrots 20 YRS

Foods NOT recommended for long-term storage:
(Me: However, these foods are great in your 3-month supply.)

  • Barley, pearled
  • Eggs, dried
  • Flour, whole wheat
  • Grains, milled (other than rolled oats)
  • Granola
  • Nuts
  • Rice, brown
  • Dried vegetables and fruits

Decide which items you want to store, study how to store them, and get moving. Good luck!

April 21, 2011

Poll: How Much is in Your Food Storage?

In a recent food storage poll on PreparedLDSFamily, an amazing 1,420 readers participated. Most of my readers live in the United States but some live worldwide. Obviously this is not a Gallup poll; however my readers are earnestly seeking emergency preparedness. Over the past two months, participants were asked, "How Much is in Your Food Storage?" Here are the interesting results:

Online Graphing

As you look at these numbers you can see that close to 25% have less than a 1 month food storage supply, 67% have less than a 6 month supply, and only 18% have a year supply or more. Some of you are just becoming motivated

April 18, 2011

Book Review: “Shop Smart, Save More”


On a recent vacation, I read the book “Shop Smart, Save More” by Teri Gault, founder and CEO of TheGroceryGame.com. This book published in 2009 teaches you how to save money grocery shopping using coupons. Teri focuses on stockpiling, which is great for those of you building up your food storage. She divides stores into four "types." Type 1: The warehouse club store, Type 2: The supercenter (stores that have everything and anything in one place), Type 3: The EDLP, "Everyday Low Prices" store where you bag your own groceries, and Type 4: The Hi-Low, major supermarket chains. Read the book to find out how to shop at each one, and which store is the best one for you to shop at most often.

There are also grocery shopping tips and ideas on finding the best deals. The "Clip and Save" chapter covers where to find coupons,

April 15, 2011

I Choose to Dance


Today I attended the funeral of a special sister named Cindy Simpson. After losing my sister to melanoma 17 years ago, attending funerals is not always easy for me. But I cannot deny the closeness I feel to spirits who have gone to the other side when I am at a funeral. And I could image Cindy standing nearby watching the beautiful tribute her family gave to her, and smiling. Extremely proud of each of them. It is difficult going through the day constantly being on the verge of tears, but when I saw Floyd with his big smile at the funeral today, I knew he was celebrating her life.

Cindy was the kind of person everyone loved to be around.

April 12, 2011

Japan Earthquake Story and Testimony from an LDS Sister -Story 2

Read this story and testimony from an LDS woman who lived through the earthquake and tsunami in Japan. Thank you LDSMissionaryMoms for permission to share.

"It has been almost one month already since the East Japan Great Earthquake. Our Beloved Heavenly Father, I am deeply grateful for your deep love and blessings.

"There were many sad and hard things that happened on the day of the Great Earthquake and after the Earthquake. Cold nights due to the power outages, insecure days not knowing whether my family and relatives were safe or not and days when we couldn’t buy things even though we had money. Every day, I just prayed to the Lord and felt many blessings.

"I would like to share my testimony about those blessings I received. I really have never thought about myself being a disaster victim.

"2:26pm, March 11, 2011 Magnitude 9.1. It was like somebody was shaking us.

Japan Earthquake Story and Testimony from an LDS Sister - Story 1

Read these profound stories and testimonies from two LDS women who lived through the earthquake and tsunami in Japan. Thank you LDSMissionaryMoms for permission to share.

STORY 1 Testimony of a sister in Nagamachi Ward who walked from Tagajo to Natori, Sendai which is about 12 miles distance.

(Intro by Hiroko Bunderson: When we translate their testimonies, we tried to explain a little bit so other people who are not familiar with Japanese custom can understand but we didn't add too much either.)

"I was washed away while I was still in my car when the Tsunami hit after the great earthquake.

April 10, 2011

Tri-City Emergency Preparedness Fair, Fruit Heights, Utah

I'm excited to announce, I will be hosting a booth at the Tri-City Emergency Preparedness Fair 

April 30, 2011
10:00 AM to 2:00 PM
Fruit Heights, Utah

If you live local, come on by and say hi! I will be set up at the LDS church with an information booth encouraging "3-Month Food Storage, First."

Many informative booths are planned such as food, water and fuel storage along with

April 9, 2011

LDS Home Storage Center Price Changes - April 4, 2011

The LDS Home Storage Centers have new prices effective April 4, 2011. Thanks you to one of my readers who clued me in on this while I was out of town. I just updated the prices on my Utah Mega Case Lot Sale Price Comparison spreadsheet on the right sidebar of my blog and included the LDS Home Storage Centers and Costco in my area. As I see it, just like any store, prices go up for various reasons. I am not surprised. But it should get you motivated to get some food on your shelves.

Canning your own food can still be economical at the LDS Home Storage Centers and

April 3, 2011

Lessons Learned from Our Road Trip


Salt Flats, west of Utah

For our spring break from school, my daughters and I are visiting their big sister in northern California. Our girl's road trip across the Utah/Nevada desert and then over Donner Pass in California has been an adventure with preparedness lessons learned. While traveling across the Utah desert we passed the Great Salt Lake and were surprised by the mountains of salt at the Morton salt plant. We enjoyed our 12-hour journey by listening/watching DVD's. Such a vast desert which I would rather cross in the springtime than the summer.

Lesson 1 - Plan Fuel Stops
As we drove I realized I had forgotten to plan where we would stop for gas. We were out of cell phone range,

April 2, 2011

STEP 4: Longer Term Food Storage Supply


After you have completed Steps 1, 2, and 3 of the Four-Step Home Storage Approach, work on your long-term food storage.

These "foods would sustain life if nothing else were available to eat. A portion of longer-term supply items may be rotated into the three-month supply."

My suggested list of items to store in Step 1: 3-month Supply includes a portion of longer-term foods to help you get used to using them.
The definition of long-term is basic foods with 10% or less moisture and low oil content that can be stored for 20 to 30 years.

A One-Month Recommended Supply (ProvidentLiving.org)
25 lbs. Wheat, white rice, corn, and other grains 30+ years
5 lbs. Dry beans 30+ years

How many months you can store in your home depends on your finances and storage space. If you can store a year supply, then work towards that. However, don't feel guilty if you can't. Do the best you can for your circumstances.

"You may also want to add other items to your longer-term storage such as sugar, nonfat dry milk, salt, baking soda, and cooking oil. To meet nutritional needs, also store foods containing Vitamin C and other essential nutrients." ProvidentLiving.org

If stored at room temperature or cooler (75°F/24°C or lower)
these items can remain nutritious and edible.
Wheat 30+
White Rice 30+
Corn 30+
Sugar 30+
Pinto Beans 30
Rolled Oats 30
Pasta 30
Potato Flakes 30 (not Potato Pearls)
Apple slices 30
Non-fat powdered milk 20
Dehydrated Carrots 20

Foods not recommended for long-term storage:
Barley, pearled
Eggs, dried
Flour, whole wheat
Grains, milled (other than rolled oats)
Granola
Nuts
Rice, brown
Sugar, brown
Dried vegetables and fruits (must be dry enough, inside and out, to snap when bent)

Read more about long-term foods at ProvidentLiving.org.

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